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Sustainable Living Blog

Perennial Polyculture Guidelines for Creating a Food Forest

Posted by on Dec 17, 2012 in Blog, How To, Videos | Comments Off on Perennial Polyculture Guidelines for Creating a Food Forest

Perennial Polyculture Guidelines for Creating a Food Forest

In this video, Eric Toensmeier, explains how to set up your own perennial polyculture of edible and multi-functional plants.  This is the basis for a highly functional and productive food forest.  Do you have some favorite perennial plants that work in San Diego? In addition to the many fruit trees that we can grow here […]

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What Permaculture Isn’t—and Is

Posted by on Dec 3, 2012 in Articles, Blog | Comments Off on What Permaculture Isn’t—and Is

What Permaculture Isn’t—and Is

Permaculture is notoriously hard to define. A recent survey shows that people simultaneously believe it is a design approach, a philosophy, a movement, and a set of practices. This broad and contradiction-laden brush doesn’t just make permaculture hard to describe. It can be off-putting, too. Let’s say you first encounter permaculture as a potent method of food production and are just starting to grasp that it is more than that, when someone tells you that it also includes goddess spirituality, and anti-GMO activism, and barefoot living. What would you make of that?

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At Least 78 Reasons Why You Shouldn’t ‘Clean Up’ Your Garden

Posted by on Nov 28, 2012 in Blog | Comments Off on At Least 78 Reasons Why You Shouldn’t ‘Clean Up’ Your Garden

At Least 78 Reasons Why You Shouldn’t ‘Clean Up’ Your Garden

Guest Blog Post by Diane Kennedy he idea of cleaning up all the dead plants out of the garden in the Fall has been so drilled into us that it is almost second nature.  There are a certain amount of things to do in a garden in the Fall, but second-guessing nature’s usage of plants shouldn’t be […]

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Leave the Leaves

Posted by on Nov 16, 2012 in Articles, Blog, recipes, soil | Comments Off on Leave the Leaves

Leave the Leaves

We are in a season named after leaves: Fall. When deciduous trees drop their leaves they are shutting down their systems for the winter. In warm climates native plants don’t do this, rather they shed leaves over a period of time, never turning off their ability to create food through photosynthesis. Evergreens also do this, providing shelter and food for animals no matter the weather. In cooler climates many trees go into semi-dormancy, kind of a half sleep.

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Uses for Whey

Posted by on Nov 15, 2012 in Blog, cheese making, recipes | Comments Off on Uses for Whey

Uses for Whey

Cheese making is a cool hobby, and one that will impress your friends. But if you are thinking about trying your hand, consider first the dark underbelly of cheemaking. The secret they don’t want you to know; whey.

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Homemade Chevre

Posted by on Nov 14, 2012 in Blog, cheese making, How To, recipes | Comments Off on Homemade Chevre

Homemade Chevre

If you’ve been thinking about making cheese, or are even curious about the process, Chevre is the place to start. Chevre is the soft, fresh goat cheese, usually sold in round logs wrapped in plastic. Occasionally a slightly drier version is available in a crumble.

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Why Plant Natives

Posted by on Nov 13, 2012 in Blog | Comments Off on Why Plant Natives

Why Plant Natives

Why is planting native vegetation a good idea? We all know that native plants arranged in natural combinations and densities provide safety corridors for our native animals. San Diego’s plant communities have, like all established ecosystems, developed a symbiotic relationship with native and migratory fauna. Our plants leaf out, bloom and fruit when native animals and insects need the food, and provide appropriate nutrition that imported or invasive plants may not. Wildlife then disperses seed and pollen in methods that suit the plants, as well as providing the fertilizer for which the plants have adapted. Flora and fauna have set up symbiotic relationships to an extent where some species rely solely on a single other species for their existence. A balanced ecosystem is a dance between inhabitants who know each other’s needs and satisfy them for their own survival.

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Greywater: A Simple and Effective Resource for Water Starved San Diego

Posted by on Nov 12, 2012 in Articles, Blog | Comments Off on Greywater: A Simple and Effective Resource for Water Starved San Diego

Greywater: A Simple and Effective Resource for Water Starved San Diego

Greywater is water that comes from showers, sinks, and laundry before it combines with toilet water. Kitchen sink water is blackwater in California. Many people are nervous about using greywater for fear of contamination and the ick-factor. Greywater use is not only common but legal and encouraged by public utilities all over Arizona, New Mexico, Australia, and many other parts of the world. There are over a million users in California alone, and no instance of anyone getting sick from greywater use.

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Watershed 2.0 (Re-thinking and Retrofitting for Resilience)

Posted by on Nov 10, 2012 in Blog | Comments Off on Watershed 2.0 (Re-thinking and Retrofitting for Resilience)

Brock Dolman speaking at a Ted X event in San Francisco on the importance of watershed resilience and how everyone of us can play a part in growing the solution.

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What to do with the Fall Harvest?

Posted by on Oct 26, 2012 in Articles, Blog, recipes | Comments Off on What to do with the Fall Harvest?

What to do with the Fall Harvest?

If you are like us, your kitchen counters are overflowing with winter squash right now! They make pretty great table toppers for fall feasts but don’t forget how delicious they can be as part of the feast. We rustled up some of our favorite squash recipes that will get you thinking about what to do with your harvest!

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